Troubleshooting Mailgun “550 Sender has no A, AAAA, or MX DNS records.”

Troubleshooting Mailgun “550 Sender has no A, AAAA, or MX DNS records.” featured image
(Last Updated On: December 13, 2017)

Sometimes, we setup Mailgun for transactional email, because this helps web based forms, and other, email to get sent to the right place. Its also free, as in beer, at least for the first 10,000 mails a months.

But we ran into a deliverability issue on one or two domains, which would sometime say things like:

550 Sender has no A, AAAA, or MX DNS records.

How to fix that? We thought. Well, the clue is in the message!

At the recipient, sometimes (though there is no actual standard or rule which says this should be done!), there is a DNS check to see if the sending domain is at the same URL as the domain from which the mail originated. Correctly formed SPF records should be respected and allow this, but there it is, some “spam filters” make this check.

But at Mailgun, we setup a special `mg.somedomain.com` subdomain to send transactional email from, right?

Yes, and that is where this “issue” stems from.

The fix?

Make a domain a record in your DNS which points to the same IP as the address from which your mailgun mail will originate from (often this will be where your “www” record will point), and, when this is updated and has propagated (yawn, we know, it takes a long time… can’t be helped) your mail will start sending correctly!

3 thoughts on “Troubleshooting Mailgun “550 Sender has no A, AAAA, or MX DNS records.”

  1. Hi, I’m running into the same error message that you were and I’ve tried fixing it but I’m not sure whether I’ve created the correct a-record. I added a mg.mydomain.co record with a value of the IP Address that is shown on my MailGun dashboard under Domians>mg.mydomain.co>Domain Information>IP Address. Is this correct or should it be the I.P Address of my main site?

    Thanks in advance 🙂

    1. Hi Matt,

      The A record should be setup at mg.mydomain.co to point to where your server is – the mail origin server. This is the IP where your website is hosted.

      So where your WWW a record points – to that IP. Or, if you have an @ a record, to that IP.

      Robin

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